The Initial Impact of the Open Scholarship Policy Observatory

Authors

  • Sarah Milligan Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria
  • Kimberly Silk Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria
  • Alyssa Arbuckle Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria
  • Ray Siemens Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5334/kula.43

Keywords:

scholarship, collaboration, open science

Abstract

In September 2016, members of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership—a broad, diverse group working to advance understanding of, and resolve critical issues in, the production, distribution and widespread engagement of digital scholarship in Canada and beyond—met to discuss future directions and focus areas. One of the resulting initiatives is the Open Scholarship Policy Observatory. The Open Scholarship Policy Observatory tracks national and international policies and policy changes in order to assist INKE partners with developing timely and responsive policies. This paper describes the development of the initiative, and reports on the initial impacts the project has had to date.

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Author Biography

Kimberly Silk, Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria

Kimberly Silk is a librarian and researcher with a background in scholarly communication, research data management, and bibliometrics.

References

Canadian Social Knowledge Institute. 2017. “Open Scholarship Policy Observatory.” Open Scholarship Policy Observatory. https://ospolicyobservatory.uvic.ca/.

Government of Canada. 2015. “Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications.” http://www.science.gc.ca/eic/site/063.nsf/eng/h_F6765465.html. Archived at: https://perma.cc/67VV-TT3F.

Government of Canada. 2016. “Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management.” http://www.science.gc.ca/eic/site/063.nsf/eng/h_83F7624E.html?OpenDocument. Archived at: https://perma.cc/DUN3-A42V.

Harnad, Stevan. 2015. “Optimizing Open Access Policy.” The Serials Librarian, 69(2): 133–41. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2015.1076368

Kingsley, Danny Abigail. 2012. “Build It and They Will Come? Support for Open Access in Australia.” Scholarly and Research Communication, 4(1): 1–16. DOI: https://doi.org/10.22230/src.2013v4n1a39

Owen, Brian. 2017. “Partner Response to Canada’s Fundamental Science Review: Some Observations from the Perspective of a Past and Present Participant in CFI-Funded Projects.” Open Scholarship Policy Observatory (blog), December 1. https://ospolicyobservatory.uvic.ca/partner_response_naylor_owen/. Archived at: https://perma.cc/HD4H-VAV8.

Pinfield, Stephen. 2015. “Making Open Access Work: The ‘State-of-the-Art’ in Providing Open Access to Scholarly Literature.” Online Information Review, 39(5): 604–36. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/OIR-05-2015-0167

Suber, Peter. 2012. Open Access. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access.

Veletsianos, George. 2016. Social Media in Academia: Networked Scholars. London, UK: Routledge. DOI: https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315742298

Wellcome Trust. 2017. “Policy on Data, Software and Materials Management and Sharing.” Wellcome Trust, July 10. https://wellcome.ac.uk/funding/managing-grant/policy-data-software-materials-management-and-sharing. Archived at: https://perma.cc/5BXN-PLLW.

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Published

2019-02-27

How to Cite

Milligan, Sarah, Kimberly Silk, Alyssa Arbuckle, and Ray Siemens. 2019. “The Initial Impact of the Open Scholarship Policy Observatory”. KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies 3 (1):16. https://doi.org/10.5334/kula.43.

Issue

Section

Project Reports

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