Foundations for On-Campus Open Social Scholarship Activities

Authors

  • Randa El Khatib University of Victoria
  • Alyssa Arbuckle University of Victoria
  • Ray Siemens University of Victoria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5334/kula.14

Keywords:

social knowledge creation, open social scholarship, citizen scholar, scholarly communication, Wikipedia

Abstract

Social knowledge creation, citizen scholarship, interdisciplinary collaborations, and university-community partnerships have become more common and more visible in contemporary academia. The Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) currently focuses on how to engage with such transformations in knowledge creation. In this paper we survey the intellectual foundation of social knowledge creation and major initiatives undertaken to pursue and enact this research in the ETCL. “Social Knowledge Creation: Three Annotated Bibliographies” (Arbuckle, Belojevic, Hiebert, Siemens, et al. 2014), and an updated iteration, “An Annotated Bibliography on Social Knowledge Creation,” (Arbuckle, El Hajj, El Khatib, Seatter, Siemens, et al, 2017), explore how academics collaborate to create knowledge, and how social knowledge creation can bridge the real or perceived gap between the academy and the public. This knowledgebase lays the foundation for the “Open Social Scholarship Annotated Bibliography” (El Hajj, El Khatib, Leibel, Seatter, et al. 2019), which draws on research that adopts and propagates social knowledge creation ideals and explores trends such as accessible research development and dissemination. Using these annotated bibliographies as a theoretical foundation for action, the ETCL began test-driving open social scholarship initiatives with the launch of the Open Knowledge Practicum (OKP). The OKP invites members of the community and the university to pursue their own research in the ETCL. Research output is published in open, public venues. Overall, we aim to acknowledge the expanding, social nature of knowledge production, and to detail how the ETCL utilizes in-person interaction and the digital medium to facilitate open social scholarship.

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Author Biographies

Randa El Khatib, University of Victoria

Randa El Khatib is pursuing her doctoral degree in the English Department at the University of Victoria. She is the Special Projects Coordinator at the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, where she oversees the Open Knowledge Practicum and other projects. Working on plays and epic poetry of the English Renaissance, Randa’s research focuses on how space is represented in fictional and allegorical settings. She is the project manager of the TopoText team that develops digital mapping tools for humanities research at the American University of Beirut. Randa also holds the ADHO Communications Fellow position.

Alyssa Arbuckle, University of Victoria

Alyssa Arbuckle is the Associate Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (ETCL) at the University of Victoria, where she works with the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) research group and the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). Arbuckle is also an interdisciplinary PhD student at the University of Victoria, studying open social scholarship and its implementation (planned completion 2019). She holds a BA Honours in English from the University of British Columbia and an MA in English from the University of Victoria, and her previous studies have centred around digital humanities, new media, and contemporary American literature. Her work has appeared in Digital Studies, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and Scholarly and Research Communication, among other venues.

Ray Siemens, University of Victoria

A leader of collaborative, transformative, interdisciplinary scholarship and pedagogy, Dr. Raymond Siemens is Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Victoria, in English with cross appointment in Computer Science, appointed also 2004-15 as Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing. He is the Director of the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria, as well as the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership and the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). Siemens has also served as Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Digital Humanities at King's College London, Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for English Studies London (2005, 2008), Visiting Professor at Sheffield Hallam U (2004-11), Ritsumeikan U Kyoto (2010), New York U (2013), U Passau (2014), and U Tokyo (2014), and Visiting Professor at U Western Sydney (2014-15). The editor of several Renaissance texts, Siemens is also the founding editor of the electronic scholarly journal Early Modern Literary Studies. He has authored numerous articles on the intersection of literary studies and computational methods and is the co-editor of several book collections on humanities computing topics, among them Blackwell's Companion to Digital Humanities (with Susan Schreibman and John Unsworth), the Blackwell Companion to Digital Literary Studies (with Susan Schreibman), and MLA's Literary Studies in the Digital Age (with Ken Price).

References

Arbuckle, Alyssa, and Alex Christie, with the INKE, ETCL, and MVP Research Groups. 2015. “Intersections Between Social Knowledge Creation and Critical Making.” Scholarly and Research Communication, 6(3): n.p. DOI: https://doi.org/10.22230/src.2015v6n3a200

Arbuckle, Alyssa, Nina Belojevic, Matthew Hiebert, and Raymond G. Siemens, with Shaun Wong, Derek Siemens, Alex Christie, Jon Saklofske, Jentery Sayers, and the INKE & ETCL Research Groups. 2014. “Social Knowledge Creation: Three Annotated Bibliographies.” Scholarly and Research Communication, 5(2): n.p. DOI: https://doi.org/10.22230/src.2014v5n2a150

Arbuckle, Alyssa, Nina Belojevic, Tracey El Hajj, Randa El Khatib, Lindsey Seatter, and Raymond G. Siemens, with Alex Christie, Matthew Hiebert, Jon Saklofske, Jentery Sayers, Derek Siemens, Shaun Wong, and the INKE and ETCL Research Groups. 2017. “An Annotated Bibliography of Social Knowledge Creation.” In: Social Knowledge Creation in the Humanities: Volume I, Alyssa Arbuckle, Aaron Mauro, and Daniel Powell (Eds.), 29–264. Arizona: Iter Academic Press and Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Crompton, Constance, Daniel Powell, Alyssa Arbuckle, and Raymond G. Siemens, with Maggie Shirley and the Devonshire Manuscript Editorial Group. 2015. “Building a Social Edition of the Devonshire Manuscript.” Renaissance and Reformation, 37(4): 131–56. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43446354.

El Khatib, Randa, Lindsey Seatter, Tracey El-Hajj, and Conrad Leibel, with Alyssa Arbuckle, Ray Siemens, Caroline Winter, and the ETCL Research Group. 2019. “Open Social Scholarship Annotated Bibliography.” KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies.

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. 2011. Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy. New York: New York University Press.

Gaertner, David. 2016. “A Landless Territory? Augmented Reality, Land, and Indigenous Storytelling in Cyberspace.” In: Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures, Deanna Reder, and Linda M. Morra (eds.), 493–98. Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier University Press.

Nosek, Brian A. 2017. “Opening Science.” In: Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science, Rajiv S. Jhangiani, and Robert Biswas-Diener (eds.), 89–100. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/bbc

Paterson, Jody. 2017. “Citizen Scientists are the Future of our Oceans.” University of Victoria, June 5. Accessed July 24, 2018. https://www.uvic.ca/news/topics/2017+citizen-scientists-onc+ring. Archived at: https://perma.cc/QV92-BBFM.

Siemens, Raymond G., Karin Armstrong, Constance Crompton, and the Devonshire Manuscript Editorial Group. (Eds.) 2012. A Social Edition of the Devonshire Manuscript. Wikibooks. https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/The_Devonshire_Manuscript.

Siemens, Raymond G., Meagan Timney, Cara Leitch, Corina Koolen, and Alex Garnett, and the ETCL, INKE, & PKP Research Groups. 2012a. “Toward Modeling the Social Edition: An Approach to Understanding the Electronic Scholarly Edition in the Context of New and Emerging Social Media.” Literary and Linguistic Computing, 27(4): 445–61. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqs013.

Siemens, Raymond G., Meagan Timney, Cara Leitch, Corina Koolen, and Alex Garnett, and the ETCL, INKE, & PKP Research Groups. 2012b. “Understanding the Electronic Scholarly Edition in the Context of New and Emerging Social Media: Selected, Annotated Bibliographies.” Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(1): n.p.

Siemens, Raymond G., Mike Elkink, Alastair McColl, Karin Armstrong, James Dixon, Angelsea Saby, Brett D. Hirsch and Cara Leitch, with Martin Holmes, Eric Haswell, Chris Gaudet, Paul Girn, Michael Joyce, Rachel Gold, and Gerry Watson, and members of the PKP, Iter, TAPoR, and INKE Research Teams. 2010. “Underpinnings of the Social Edition? A Narrative, 2004–9, for the Renaissance English Knowledgebase (REKn) and Professional Reading Environment (PReE) Projects.” In: Online Humanities Scholarship: The Shape of Things to Come, Jerome McGann, with Andrew Stauffer, Dana Wheeles, and Michael Pickard.(eds.). Houston, TX: Rice University Press.

Social Sciences Graduate Studies. 2017. “Scuba Divers Count Fish for Science.” University of Victoria, July 13. Accessed July 24, 2018. https://www.uvic.ca/news/topics/2017+scuba-divers-count-fish-for-science+media-release. Archived at: https://perma.cc/8ZXW-PGVE.

Willinsky, John. 2006. The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship. Cambridge: MIT Press.

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Published

2019-02-27

How to Cite

El Khatib, Randa, Alyssa Arbuckle, and Ray Siemens. 2019. “Foundations for On-Campus Open Social Scholarship Activities”. KULA: Knowledge Creation, Dissemination, and Preservation Studies 3 (1):3. https://doi.org/10.5334/kula.14.

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